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Events happening near by Glendale Rd Charlottesville Virginia USA



Mumford and Sons



Venue:
John Paul Jones Arena
295 Massie Rd Charlottesville

When:
Sat, 16 Mar 2019 7.30pm -
Thu, 1 Jan 1970 1.00am


Luke Combs


Luke Combs will kick off his “Beer Never Broke My Heart Tour” in 2019—his first ever headline arena tour, marking another major career milestone for the breakthrough musician. The extensive tour—which will feature special guests LANCO and Jameson Rodgers.

Venue:
John Paul Jones Arena
295 Massie Rd Charlottesville

When:
Sat, 23 Feb 2019 7.00pm -
Sat, 23 Feb 2019 10.30pm


Jeff Dunham - Passively Aggressive


Record-breaking global comedy superstar Jeff Dunham is taking his cast of characters on the road this fall through spring 2019, as he tours North America on his "Passively Aggressive Tour." The tour will stop in Charlottesville, Virginia at John Paul Jones Arena on April 12th. Dunham, a Guinness World Record holder for “Most Tickets Sold for a Stand-up Comedy Tour,” has built an entertainment empire over years of nonstop touring and innovation.

Venue:
John Paul Jones Arena
295 Massie Rd Charlottesville

When:
Fri, 12 Apr 2019 7.00pm -
Thu, 1 Jan 1970 1.00am


Steve Earle & The Dukes - 30th Anniversary of Copperhead Road with The Mastersons


About Steve Earle & The Dukes:
If you ever had any doubt about where Steve Earle’s musical roots are planted, his new collection, So You Wannabe an Outlaw, makes it perfectly plain.  “There’s nothing ‘retro’ about this record,” he states, “I’m just acknowledging where I’m coming from.”  So You Wannabe an Outlaw is the first recording he has made in Austin, Texas.  Earle has lived in New York City for the past decade but he acknowledges, “Look, I’m always gonna be a Texan, no matter what I do. And I’m always going to be somebody who learned their craft in Nashville. It’s who I am.”

In the 1970s, artists such as Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Johnny Paycheck, Billy Joe Shaver and Tompall Glaser gave country music a rock edge, some raw grit and a rebel attitude. People called what these artists created “outlaw music.” The results were country’s first Platinum-certified records, exciting and fresh stylistic breakthroughs and the attraction of a vast new youth audience to a genre that had previously been by and for adults. In the eighties, The Highwaymen was formed by Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Kris Kristofferson and Waylon Jennings. Their final album “The Road Goes On Forever” released in 1996 began with the Steve Earle song “The Devil’s Right Hand.”

Steve Earle’s 2017 collection, So You Wannabe an Outlaw, is an homage to outlaw music. “I was out to unapologetically ‘channel’ Waylon as best as I could.” says Earle. “This record was all about me on the back pick-up of a Fender Telecaster on an entire record for the first time in my life.  The singing part of it is a little different. I certainly don’t sound like Waylon Jennings.”

“I moved to Nashville in November of 1974, and right after that Willie Nelson’s Red Headed Stranger came out. I was around when Waylon was recording [the 1975 masterpiece] Dreaming My Dreams.  Guitar Town(Earle’s 1986 breakthrough album) wound up being kind of my version of those types of songs,” Earle recalls.

“This new record started because T Bone Burnett called me and wanted a specific song to be written for the first season of (the TV series) Nashville. It was for the character whose brother was in prison. So I wrote ‘If Mama Coulda Seen Me,’ and they used it. Then Buddy Miller asked me to write another one for the show and I wrote ‘Lookin’ for a Woman,’ which they didn’t wind up using. I’d been listening to Waylon’s Honky Tonk Heroes again, and I decided to start writing in that direction.”

The new songs include the gentle, acoustic folk ballads “News From Colorado” and “The Girl on the Mountain.” “Fixin’ to Die,” on the other hand, is a dark shout from the hell of Death Row. “The Firebreak Line” returns Earle to his pile-driving, country-rock roots. “You Broke My Heart” is a sweet, simple salute to the 1950s sounds of Webb Pierce or Carl Smith.  “Walkin’ in L.A.” is a twanging country shuffle. The guitar-heavy “Sunset Highway” is an instant-classic escape song. And the deeply touching “Goodbye Michelangelo” is Steve Earle’s farewell to his mentor, Guy Clark, who passed away last year. “It was written right after me and Rodney Crowell and Shawn Camp and a few other folks had taken Guy’s ashes to Terry Allen’s house in New Mexico,” Earle says. “I was only 19 when I came to Nashville. Guy and Susanna Clark finished raising me. Guy was a great cheerleader for me.”

Earle is backed on the new album by his long time band The Dukes (guitarist Chris Masterson, fiddle player Eleanor Whitmore, bassist Kelly Looney, and new members drummer Brad Pemberton and pedal steel player Ricky Ray Jackson). “We did the Guitar Town 30th-anniversary tour last year,” he said. “And that was perfect to write the last of the songs for this record. Because I had the band out there with me, and we could try out some stuff.”

“Waylon’s Honky Tonk Heroes was the template for the new album. And I’ve always considered that record to be really important. I consider his Honky Tonk Heroes the Exile on Main Street of country music.”

“I knew when I wrote ‘Walkin’ in L.A.’ that I wanted Johnny Bush to sing on it.  I’ve known Johnny since 1973 when I was playing a restaurant in San Antonio. Joe Voorhees, who played piano for Bush, and I were stoned and hungry, so we went to Bush’s and raided the icebox in his kitchen. We’re sitting there, and Joe goes white and says, ‘John!’ I turned around and there was a .357 Magnum pointed at the back of my head. So that’s how I really met Johnny Bush. Years later, he signed an autograph to me that said, ‘Steve, I’m glad I didn’t pull the trigger.’”

Steve Earle’s third duet partner on So You Wannabe an Outlaw is Miranda Lambert. The two co-wrote their vocal collaboration “This Is How it Ends.” “I learned from Guy Clark that co-writing might lead me to write some stuff that I wouldn’t write otherwise,” comments Earle. “The song is Miranda’s title, and some of the very best lines in it are hers.”

So You Want To Be An Outlaw is dedicated to Jennings, who died in 2002. The deluxe CD and the vinyl version of the album include Earle’s remakes of the timeless Waylon Jennings anthem “Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way,” as well as Billy Joe Shaver’s “Ain’t No God in Mexico,” which Jennings popularized as well as Earle’s versions of “Sister’s Coming Home” and “The Local Memory,” songs that first appeared on Willie Nelson discs. Nelson is his duet partner on the new album’s title track.

Steve Earle has turned many musical corners during his illustrious career. He has been equally acclaimed as a folk troubadour, a rockabilly raver, a contemplative bluesman, a honky-tonk rounder, a snarling rocker and even a bluegrass practitioner. This definitive Americana artist has won three Grammy Awards, for 2005’s The Revolution Starts Now, 2008’s Washington Square Serenade and 2010’s Townes. 

He is also the author of the 2011 short-story collection Doghouse Roses and novel I’ll Never Get Out of This World Alive. Earle has been featured as an actor in two HBO series, The Wire and Treme, and on stage inThe Exonerated. His film work includes roles in such respected features as The World Made Straight(2015), Leaves of Grass (2009) and Dixieland (2015). For the past decade he has hosted the weekly show Hardcore Troubadour for the Outlaw Country Channel on SiriusXM Radio and he is a longtime social and political activist whose causes have included the abolition of the death penalty and the removal of the Confederate symbol from the Mississippi State flag.

Earle has collaborated on recordings with such superb talents as Sheryl Crow, The Indigo Girls, The Pogues, Lucinda Williams Shawn Colvin, Patti Smith, Chris Hillman, The Fairfield Four and The Del McCoury Band. His songs have been used in more than fifty films and have been recorded by such legends as Johnny Cash, Emmylou Harris, and Joan Baez, Carl Perkins, Vince Gill and Waylon Jennings (who recorded Earle’s “The Devil’s Right Hand” twice).


Venue:
Jefferson Theater
110 East Main Street Charlottesville

When:
Thu, 29 Nov 2018 8.00pm -
Thu, 1 Jan 1970 1.00am


Rufus Wainwright



Venue:
Paramount Theater
215 East Main Street Charlottesville

When:
Mon, 10 Dec 2018 8.00pm -
Thu, 1 Jan 1970 1.00am


The Tallest Man on Earth



Venue:
Jefferson Theater
110 East Main Street Charlottesville

When:
Sat, 11 May 2019 8.00pm -
Thu, 1 Jan 1970 1.00am


Leon Bridges



Venue:
Sprint Pavilion
700 E. Main Street Charlottesville

When:
Wed, 10 Apr 2019 7.00pm -
Thu, 1 Jan 1970 1.00am


The Black Lillies



Venue:
The Southern Cafe and Music Hall (Charlottesville)
103 1st Street South Charlottesville

When:
Sat, 17 Nov 2018 8.30pm -
Thu, 1 Jan 1970 1.00am


The Harlem Globeetrotters


The Harlem Globetrotters are bringing their one-of-a-kind show to Charlottesville at John Paul Jones Arena on March, 15th at 7:00PM. Featuring some of the most elite dunkers on the planet, exceptional ball handlers, and Guinness World Record holders, a Globetrotters game is more than just basketball – they are the ultimate in family entertainment that will bring smiles and fan interaction to people of all ages. Don’t miss it!

Venue:
John Paul Jones Arena
295 Massie Rd Charlottesville

When:
Fri, 15 Mar 2019 7.00pm -
Thu, 1 Jan 1970 1.00am


I'm With Her (Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz, and Aoife O'Donovan) with The Brother Brothers


About I'm With Her:

A band of extraordinary chemistry and exquisite musicianship, I'm With Her features Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz, and Aoife O'Donovan. Collectively, the multi-Grammy-Award-winners have released seven solo efforts, co-founded two seminal bands (Nickel Creek and Crooked Still), and contributed to critically acclaimed albums from a host of esteemed artists. But from its very first moments, their full-length debut See You Around reveals the commitment to creating a wholly unified band sound. With each track born from close songwriting collaboration, I'm With Her builds an ineffable magic from their finespun narratives and breathtaking harmonies. The result is an album both emotionally raw and intricate, revealing layers of meaning and insight within even the most starkly adorned track.

Co-produced by Ethan Johns (Ryan Adams, Laura Marling, Paul McCartney) and the band and recorded at Peter Gabriel's Real World Studios in a tiny English village near Bath, See You Around delivers a warmly textured yet stripped-down sound that proves both fresh and timeless. To achieve the album's intimate feel, I'm With Her recorded live in the tight confines of the Wood Room, all three members performing in the same room without monitors or headphones. With its piercingly lyricism, See You Around also finds I'm With Her showing the uncompromising honesty of their songwriting. That intensity is heightened by the band's effortless harmonizing, which the New York Times has praised as "sweetly ethereal, or as tightly in tandem as country sibling teams like the Everly Brothers, or as hearty as mountain gospel."

Layered with lush guitar tones and crystalline harmonies, See You Around's title track opens the album with a breakup ballad of rare nuance ("It's about coming to the end of a long relationship where you both run in the same circles, and that melancholy feeling of knowing you're going to have to keep seeing that person again and again," Jarosz explains). A bittersweet mood endures for songs like "Ain't That Fine," a wistful meditation on existential ups and downs that ultimately discovers solace in its reflection and reckoning (sample lyric: "I can't believe the things I put my mother through/But it's alright, I guess we all deserve our turn to be a fool").

From track to track, I'm With Her infuses their sonic palette with so many unexpected and subtly captivating elements: the jagged guitar lines and chanteuse-like delivery of "I-89," the percussive vocal phrasing of "Game to Lose," the ghostly harmonies and eerie atmospherics of "Wild One." At the same time, the band's finely wrought lyrics gently shift from the darkly charged storytelling of "Pangaea" to the sleepy sensuality of "Ryland (Under the Apple Tree)" to the romantic travel tale of "Overland." And on the Gillian Welch-penned "Hundred Miles" -- a gorgeously understated track, and the album's only song written outside the band -- See You Around closes out with a world-weary but potent message of hope.

All through See You Around, I'm With Her exhibit a refined musicality that reflects their deep musical roots. After years of crossing paths in their intersecting scenes, the three musicians came together by happenstance for an off-the-cuff performance at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival in summer 2014. The very same day, a mutual friend texted them with a last-minute request to open a show that night at the Sheridan Opera House. "We had two hours to prepare for a 30-minute set and we said, 'Let's do it, let's skip margaritas and rehearse,'" O'Donovan recalls. "We worked up six or seven songs in the bathroom, and then went on to this crazy-energetic crowd at one in the morning. I'll never forget how amazing that felt."

Later that year, Watkins, O'Donovan, and Jarosz met up in New York to prep for a series of European shows in early 2015, carefully crafting their own arrangements of songs by artists ranging from Jim Croce to Nina Simone. "When you're arranging a song, you're communicating in ways that sometimes can be really inefficient," says Watkins. "But with us it felt like we were all in a similar rhythm." As their chemistry continued to deepen, the trio soon founded I'm With Her and transformed the project into a fully realized band. "Once you decide it's a band, you can put it higher on your priority list and give it more attention," says O'Donovan. "The bar gets raised when something has an air of permanence about it, and that's definitely been the case for us."

Although I'm With Her spent most of 2015 performing at festivals around the world, the band also holed up for their first-ever writing session that summer in L.A. "By that point it had started to solidify that we travel well together, play well together, eat well together -- it felt like we'd tested our compatibility in all these different zones," says Watkins. And after just four days of writing, it was clear that their compatibility extended to the art of songcraft. "I loved the songs, we all loved the songs," says Jarosz of that first batch of tracks penned in L.A. "I think that really sparked the flame for us to make a full record together."

When it came time to get working on the record, I'm With Her convened at a borrowed farmhouse in Vermont and spent over a week carving out new material, leaving only to replenish their supply of Heady Topper beer. "We were completely on lockdown and didn't interact with another human being for eight days," says O'Donovan. "If you can get through that and, at the end, still be so excited about what you're doing, then that says a lot about the whole creative flow as a band." Jarosz adds: "A lot of times you approach songwriting as a solitary act, or maybe choose to write with one other person you feel comfortable with. It's a whole other beast to have three people writing together, juggling all these different ideas and personalities. But somehow for us, all of the songwriting was just so seamless."

In Vermont, the band settled into their creative stride, but when the additional voice of producer Ethan Johns was added to the process in the studio, they found themselves starting another round of learning and growth. "Going into the recording, there were a lot of unknowns and a lot of questions," says Jarosz. "It was a challenge for us to figure out how to make our vision and Ethan's vision come together in a way that worked for everyone, and there was definitely some friction at times, but about halfway through we started to work it out." With each member playing guitar and handling various aspects of the instrumentation -- including fiddle and ukulele for Watkins, mandolin and banjo for Jarosz, piano and synth for O'Donovan -- the band cut most of the album live and under exceptionally close-knit conditions. "Ethan had the studio so that we played all in the same room and facing each other," Jarosz says. "There was really no separation between us at all."

In looking back on the making of See You Around, I'm With Her note that a sense of unity has sustained in every step -- including the moments when one member's song idea failed to fly with the others. "If an idea doesn't get accepted, it's not like, 'I'm a failure, this will never be heard,'" says Watkins. "You just move on to the next thing and put that idea aside for something else. We don't have to be as precious with things, which really helps that forward-motion of creativity." It's exactly that dynamic spirit that, despite the album's many moments of graceful restraint, imbues so much of See You Around with a powerful urgency -- or, as O'Donovan, puts it: "In this band, there's no time to get bogged down in what doesn't happen. It's all about what is happening."


Venue:
Jefferson Theater
110 East Main Street Charlottesville

When:
Thu, 15 Nov 2018 8.00pm -
Thu, 1 Jan 1970 1.00am

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